March 26, 2009

Prince's Plume


Prince's plume, also called desert plume
(Stanleya pinnata) of the mustard family grows up to 4 feet tall, often in selenium-rich soils.
This is a perennial herb. Both seeds and plant were used by Native Americans.
Steve took this photo in Canyonlands in May, 2002.
To see more skies from around the world, click here.

44 comments:

  1. that is a beautiful photo, the sky is so blue, love the Princes plume

    ReplyDelete
  2. Beautiful Janie! I like the blooms in the foreground of those fluffy clouds and mountain. Very nice. And thank you for the Princes Plume info---I don't think I've ever seen it before...

    ReplyDelete
  3. Fantastic skywatch photo with brilliant colors, great capture.

    Have a great weekend!
    Guy
    Regina In Pictures

    ReplyDelete
  4. As much as I love the sky, the flowers in this photo really make it!

    ReplyDelete
  5. That picture is a canvas, complete in itself. The sky is beautiful, but so is the Prices plume (lovely name, by the way!), as well as the depth of the picture. I can just imagine standing there with a hard-working horse by one's side. And not to forget the Daisy/Sheba element.

    ReplyDelete
  6. A photo of what we can look forward to. ;-) May is only a bit more than a month away. YAY!

    ReplyDelete
  7. that's a rare shade of sky you found there. Nicely done!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Oh that's a beautiful plant, is this considered a grass?

    ReplyDelete
  9. Love the flower/herb. But I really love the view behind it. So wonderful how you captured the flower so well, but the mountain is relatively clear!

    ReplyDelete
  10. lovely composition to this shot...beautiful.
    have a good weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  11. A interesting and beautiful photo. I love the look of the yellow, tall mustard flowers growing between the rocks. It is interesting to read about the Selenium. On our grazing property we had to add Selenium in selective amounts to the drinking water for the cattle. It is said lettuce contains selenium, but first it has to be in the soil to be in the lettuce. Now, practically all lettuce is grown in hydroponics I guess it is not the optimum. I still grow lettuce in soil, it tastes differently much better. Any way I am talking about your picture, I love it.

    ReplyDelete
  12. What beautiful colour and contrasts. I love the clouds on the horizon. Thank you for sharing Janie (and Steve) and have a great weekend.
    Smiles

    ReplyDelete
  13. I love how you teach us about these beautiful desert plants! They are so beautiful. I never would have thought that, and you capture them wonderfully.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I love the way the plume looks against the sky. I have a thing about plumes. I grow several different types of ornamental grasses with plumes I love to photograph but wild ones in a natural setting are unbeatable for beauty.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I just love your beautiful skywatch image. I also enjoyed learning about the Prince's plume. Great post!

    ReplyDelete
  16. The yellow flowers against the blue sky is simply very wonderful! Thanks for showing.

    ReplyDelete
  17. I can see that we are going to have to revisit Canyonland in the spring some time. I have always wanted to do a spring desert trip, but could do it now that we are both retired.

    ReplyDelete
  18. This photo is really pretty. Perfect place to visit and enjoy the day. Hope you have a wonderful weekend. Smile Jesus loves you.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Gorgeous! What are they used for?

    ReplyDelete
  20. Coyote Fe: Actually, I was hoping no one would ask exactly what they're used for, because my plant book doesn't specify. But since they're of the mustard family, I would assume you could eat the leaves like mustard greens, and use the seeds as a seasoning... That's my best guess and I'm sticking to it -- unless someone has better information, of course.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Ahhhh...it looks warm and peaceful. Your sky is beautiful, too.

    ReplyDelete
  22. That is a wonderful portrait of that herb.

    ReplyDelete
  23. A plant I have never heard of, and a lovely picture!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Those plumes reach for the life found in that glorious sky.

    Nice capture.

    So where's Monument Point on the NR? The park's still closed, wonder how much snow this year?

    ReplyDelete
  25. Native Americans knew so much about plant life and uses...

    ReplyDelete
  26. I really like the composition in this picture--who would have guessed Steve had such creative talents? (maybe you?)

    ReplyDelete
  27. The Princes Booms just lead you into your picture. Lovely capture.
    Thanks for you visit and comments SWF.

    ReplyDelete
  28. A nice shot and good horticultural info.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I love the closeup of the plant with the desert in the background, and the blue mountains with clouds way off yonder.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Janie: That plant makes a beautiful forefront for the sky. That was very nicely done.

    ReplyDelete
  31. I love how you have made use of the foreground to capture the sky.

    ReplyDelete
  32. I don't think the sky ever gets that color around here.
    Nice shot.

    ReplyDelete
  33. i might've been here longer than friday but i'm glad that i never missed it... love the photo...

    Check out my New Updates:
    HISTORY of SUPERNOVA and SWEETPAIN
    ANGELS IN MY LIFE
    SPICES OF LIFE

    ReplyDelete
  34. what a pure photo. delightful.

    ReplyDelete
  35. This is a wonderful picture for sky watch. The herb in the foreground nicely offsets the beautiful sky behind it.

    ReplyDelete

LinkWithin

Blog Widget by LinkWithin