June 29, 2009

Making Hay

The pasture grew beautiful grass this year. All the rain was good for it.
Rain isn't good for hay making, however. We had to wait for a week's dry spell.
Here's our neighbor cutting our field on his moco (hay mower-conditioner) when we finally got a weather break last week. This amazing machine both cuts the hay and crimps it to promote fast, even drying.
Unfortunately, shortly after I took the photo, the tractor broke down. A bad bearing stopped it, and a part had to be ordered for repair.

A week later, the entire pasture is cut at last.
With no rain predicted for awhile, we should be able to put up some fine hay for winter.

Our horses will eat well. Of course, Mischief never doubted that.
For views of numerous diverse worlds, click here.

32 comments:

  1. Must be very nice to be able to grow your own hay. I suppose you pay the farmer for use of his machine, but it has still got to be a better deal. Our last bale of hay was $16. Good thing Daisy doesn't eat it too fast!

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  2. The hay next to my mother's was cut and baled :) I love the look of bales sitting in a field.

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  3. Glad your horses won't be eating you out of house and home then this winter! Nothing like the smell of hay being cut either, and oddly it's the one thing that doesn't give me hayfever.

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  4. Very interesting...waiting on Mother nature...aren't we all at her mercy??
    Mischief is so cute!!

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  5. Thats a fine looking horse.

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  6. Yes, indeed, we all do seem to be at Mother Nature's mercy!! Love your photos, can almost smell the hay! And Mischief is such a beautiful horse! Lovely post!

    Have a great week!

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  7. That machine sounds amazing. Glad it was fixed. I love the way fields look at all the various stages. Great shot of Mischief.

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  8. beautiful shot of your mischief and great captures of the hay fields.
    have a lovely week.

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  9. I hope the haying works out. May the skies stay as blue as they are in these shots.

    I love the photo of one of your hay customers.

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  10. Excellent myworld post once again.

    Have a fantastic week
    Guy
    Regina In Pictures

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  11. I'm glad to see that you got in a good crop of hay. Hay has been in short supply around here the past two years because of our drought, but things are looking pretty good for this year. The farmers (and animals, I'm sure) are happy about that.

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  12. I'll bet Mischief and Boss love that hay. Nice to grow your own instead of paying for bales. Too bad the tractor broke down, but glad you got the job done before anymore rain.

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  13. So Mischief is like those people who pay to sit in the kitchen of a restaurant and watch the food be prepared?

    Smarter actually - someone does the paying for her. :)

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  14. So very different from my world. I love it!
    Bring on the recipes for my new blog! :-)

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  15. The whole hay thing is complicated to me. I'm told you need water and heat at the right time but to cut the hay it needs to be dry until you get it baled.
    I could never be a farmer or rancher.

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  16. I am glad we are getting a break from the rain...but isn't everything so unusually green!? Your horse is a beauty.

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  17. SO interesting, Janie.. My world has never included baling hay. Of course, I've never lived on or near a farm or ranch.... See how much I have missed!!!!

    Your horses will love that hay this winter.
    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  18. I love the smell of freshly mowed hay.

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  19. I love the horse picture and could smell the hay being baled...lovely.

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  20. Ohhhhhhh noooooooooo . . . now I want to ride horses in addition to being a musher . . . what's a city grrl to do?!?!?

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  21. mischief looks great!

    Have started a new meme Pet Pride where you can display your or your friends’ pets every week beginning every Sunday through the week! Do join in and share your pet pride with the world!

    would love to see mischief and daisy there!

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  22. A beautiful lush hay meadow and a very happy horse!

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  23. Utah---first two comments on my blog for My World from Utah. Did you put up the hay in big round rolls. We made hay on our Ohio farm years ago in bales and my dad sold the hay to the thoroughbred horse farms in Kentucky. Happy riding!

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  24. Mischief looks very happy! I remember the smell of a newly cut pasture. My goodness, that was a long time ago ... I was very young. Things have sure changed (thank goodness)! Thanks for the memories and the post.

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  25. Beautiful pics, Janie, and I'm glad you got your hay up, dry!

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  26. They've been doing the samething here this past 2 weeks. It looks like you'll have some great hay.

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  27. Ah, now I know what a moco is. ;) We want to grow our own hay eventually - we have the space, just not our own tractor. Perhaps we can rectify that by next year! Hubby has done his own hay before, so at least one of us knows what they are doing.

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  28. Great post Janie. I love the smell of fresh cut hay fields and it is nice to be able to have your own feed. The weather is certainly an hard taskmaster sometimes. Thanks for sharing and have a great week.
    Smiles

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  29. Makin' hay could be more fun than in your world!

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  30. Interesting post about haymaking. Mischief won't starve for the coming winter.

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